A Field Guide to Lies - Wikipedia

 

a field guide to critical thinking

critical thinking field guide weaponized lies guide to lies daniel levitin new york think critically york times numbers to words lies and statistics social media come across organized mind reading this book already know even though make sense many different information age thinking in the ahjanss.ga by: 2. Daniel Levitin's Field guide presents a guide for putting in practice critical thinking, ranging from analyzing how numbers are presented in graphs, to applying Bayesian probabilities to court cases and life's decision, to recognizing logical fallacies and much more. The style is /5. A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age, written by Daniel J. Levitin was originally published in in hardcover by Dutton, and was republished in in paperback with a revised introduction under the new title Weaponized Lies: How to Think Critically in the Post-truth Era. It is a non-fiction book to help people learn critical thinking skills, recognize logical Publisher: Dutton (US), Allen-Lane (Canada), Viking (U.K.).


A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age by Daniel J. Levitin


From the way averages befuddle to the logical fallacies that sneak by us, every page is enlightening. A Field Guide to Lies does a terrific job of illustrating the difference between the two with precision—and delightful good humor. It covers so many of the insights of science, logic, and statistics that the public needs to know, yet are sadly neglected in the education that most of us receive.

I could not put this book down. Reading it has been a pleasure, believe me. I am so impressed with Levitin's writing style, which is clear and simple, unlike much of the murky stuff that is written by statisticians and many others. As Big Data becomes a dominant theme in our culture, we are a field guide to critical thinking obliged to sharpen our critical thinking so as to thwart the forces of obfuscation.

Levitin has done a great service here. Levitin shows how to critically evaluate claims that charlatans, the media, and politicians would have us believe. Daniel J. His work has been translated into 21 languages.

Before becoming a neuroscientist, he worked as a session musician, sound engineer, and record producer working with artists such as Stevie Wonder and Blue Oyster Cult. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? It's raining bad data, half-truths, and even outright lies. It's becoming harder to separate the wheat from the digital chaff. How do we distinguish misinformation, pseudo-facts, and distortions from reliable information?

Levitin groups his field guide into two categories—statistical information and faulty arguments—ultimately showing how science is the bedrock of critical thinking.

Infoliteracy means understanding that there are hierarchies of source quality and bias that variously distort our information feeds via every media channel, including social media. We may expect newspapers, a field guide to critical thinking, bloggers, the government, and Wikipedia to be factually and logically correct, but they so often a field guide to critical thinking. We need to think critically about the words and numbers we encounter if we want to be successful at work, at play, and in making the most of our lives.

This means checking the plausibility and reasoning—not passively accepting information, repeating it, and making decisions based on it. Readers learn to avoid the extremes of passive gullibility and cynical rejection. Levitin's charming, entertaining, accessible guide can help anyone wake up to a whole lot of things that aren't so. And catch some weasels in their tracks! Read more Read less. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. How to Lie with Statistics.

Darrell Huff. Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data. What a field guide to critical thinking items do customers buy after viewing this item? How to Lie with Statistics Paperback. Read more. Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on Kindle Don't have a Kindle? Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Showing of 35 reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now.

Please try again later. Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. For anyone about to start University this is a must have primer, a field guide to critical thinking. Levitin writes in such an easy going way that you can see him smiling as he provides examples to explain hard ideas in a simple, clear manner. If you find stats and research methods confusing or daunting this is for you. At the same time, as consumer of information everyone of us should be acquainted with the ideas and insights Levitin provides.

We would be less likely to fall for the poor analysis and down-right nonsense that characterizes so much of the information we consume today. Who knows An outstanding overview of critical thinking. A relatively short read but it does get the brain cells cranked up. You can't just breeze through it; you have to think and that's what makes it great. Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase. But then perhaps everyone should read it because the world is full of fake news.

But as author Daniel Levitin points out, it is not confined to just the Internet. It is everywhere, a field guide to critical thinking. While currently it is very pervasive, the improper use of statistics and numbers has always been a problem, usually unintentional in the reputable news media but intentional in the yellow press and in advertising.

The book may be a hard read for high school students and for many readers, particularly in its discussion of statistics and probabilities which are on a college level. While I think it is an outstanding book, I pondered over whether or not to give it a 5 star or a 4 star rating.

Because it has some shortcomings, I chose to give it a 4 stars. My principle reason is the organization of the book. In the back of the book is a section which displays all the sources for the statements made in the book, a field guide to critical thinking. In other words, a compendium of end notes. The problem, and it is a serious problem, is that the text of the book does not reference the end notes. This is important to those like myself, who are serious about checking the sources of the statements and data mentioned in the text.

Wikipedia is not a primary source and thus not the best source, a field guide to critical thinking. In fact, Wikipedia does not say that. It says that the mean average temperature is 77 degrees and that was not for Death Valley as a whole but at a particular location. Moreover, the extremes of degrees and 15 degrees happened in and accuracy of the degree reading has been challenged.

Court, How hot is Death Valley? Geographical Review, 39, pp, a field guide to critical thinking. Professor Court makes a compelling case that the degrees reading was erroneous and when the historical a field guide to critical thinking for Death Valley is examined, the degrees is not plausible.

Perhaps this is minutia because all a field guide to critical thinking the author is trying to establish is that a number provided by a person does not necessarily represent the actual conditions. But the author should have been more careful in picking the example and setting forth its source, partiuclarly given the subject matter of the book. Perhaps but several articles in the Economist magazine challenge this. My advice is never trust any publication even if it is supposedly peer reviewed, without thoroughly checking it out.

The author praises Consumer Reports as a reliable source, a field guide to critical thinking. Not so. After 55 years as a subscriber, I cancelled my subscription because I found it very unreliable. Its ratings often depend on personal tastes by the person or people doing the testing.

For example, a tester gives a product a poor rating because in his or her opinion the product has a cheap finish but others might prefer the finish because it is durable and to them nice looking.

Moreover, when testing a product, in most cases only one sample of the product is tested. It may the one bad sample in a thousand. Nor the times I purchased a product that had an average rating that turned out to be a gem. It is the best car I have ever owned and I have had only routine maintenance problems.

We have had Mercedes and Cadillacs but my wife thinks this SUV has the best ride of any car we have ever owned or tested. And we got it for far less than its higher rated rivals. Consumers Reports reliability ratings are not scientific. The annual questionnaire is subjective and we never know if the sampling is representative of the owners participating. If one goes on line and reads he product reviews by the public, public opinion of the product is almost always at variance with the ratings given to products by CR.

CR does not have the resources to test more than one sample of a product and since CR needs to publish its results quickly before the manufacturer changes models, it cannot test a product long enough to find out how reliable the product is. In conclusion, despite its few faults, the book is outstanding.

I recommend as a read for everyone. Recommended to me recently by a coworker and very good read. Covers critical thinking and how to remove bias or noise when performing analysis. Good read for anyone using FAIR techniques. As a person with a technical background, I consider myself apt in critical thinking. This book covered a broad spectrum of things that caused me to expand my thinking.

Appreciated the way examples were framed to challenge each of us to do our homework.

 

A Field Guide to Lies by Daniel J. Levitin | ahjanss.ga: Books

 

a field guide to critical thinking

 

Daniel Levitin's Field guide presents a guide for putting in practice critical thinking, ranging from analyzing how numbers are presented in graphs, to applying Bayesian probabilities to court cases and life's decision, to recognizing logical fallacies and much more. The style is /5. A Field Guide to Critical Thinking James Lett. From: Volume 14, No. 2 Winter Share. Tweet. James Lett. James Lett is a Professor of Anthropology, Department of Social Sciences, Indian River Community College. He is author of The Human Enterprise: A Critical Introduction to Anthropological Theory and Science, Reason, and Anthropology: The. critical thinking field guide weaponized lies guide to lies daniel levitin new york think critically york times numbers to words lies and statistics social media come across organized mind reading this book already know even though make sense many different information age thinking in the ahjanss.ga by: 2.